Upcoming Live Presentations

SPOTLIGHT mini-series: Transitional Landscapes & Tactical Mycelium - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Aug 23

Transitional Landscapes: Temporary Places with Permanent Impacts

‘Transitional landscape’ often refers to a median space between two main spaces, but what if we evaluated the concept of ‘transitional’ differently? What if transitional landscape referred to a timeline? Whether it is due to social, economic, or natural issues, many individuals often find themselves in transitional living situations - voluntarily or otherwise - such as camps, shelters, prisons, and temporary housing, to name a few. Most individuals who seek these temporary and transitional living circumstances have experienced trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder; however, the landscape and shared spaces of these places are far from serene, beautiful, and considerate of the physical and psychological needs of these individuals. The question that this research seeks to answer is how can landscape help improve the lives of those already suffering from trauma and unfortunate circumstances, through specific research on needs of individuals suffering PTSD, and designing a landscape in response to those needs in a local context.

Objectives:

  • Within the context of environmental psychology, understanding the significance and importance of landscape architecture to the psychological wellbeing of individuals.
  • Study & analysis of case studies of transitional/temporary housing landscapes, their challenges, and opportunities.
  • Design strategies and elements to use in transitional landscapes.


Tactical Mycelium: An Exploration of Wastewater Treatment Byproducts as Ephemeral Building Material

There is a growing movement of designers rethinking supposed waste products in urban industries. Within the current urban wastewater treatment process, one specific byproduct presents a unique opportunity for research into sustainable reuse: mycelium. These fine fibers of fungi serve as vast communication networks between plants and emerge on the soil’s surface as mushrooms. While ecologists and scientists research mycelium’s medicinal potential, designers are investigating its capacity as a new building material in a post-carbon future.

Tactical Mycelium explores this capacity in a 6-month Perkins+Will research grant framed by the pop-up approach and ephemeral nature of tactical urbanism initiatives, investigating the growth and optimized building potential of this fungus. The installation itself tests a singular catenary arch as the most effective way to grow the material into a self-supporting structure, use as little formwork as possible, and provide shelter and space for human occupation. Ultimately, the research aims to augment the tactical urbanist’s material palette and support future projects that reimagine our relationship with mycelium.

Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the relationship between mushrooms and urban wastewater treatment, and how this untapped byproduct might be cultivated for future use.
  • Learn about the properties of mycelium and the process of growing it into structures for short and long-term applications.
  • Learn about the methodologies and challenges of growing mycelium into a singular, self-supporting form.
Package Dates Price
SPOTLIGHT mini-series: Transitional Landscapes & Tactical Mycelium - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW) - Event Aug 23
$60.00
Member: $30.00
Member: $20.00
Member: FREE

SPOTLIGHT mini-series: Tropical TalkStory: Hardwood Hammocks and Aloha Art - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/NON-HSW)

Aug 24

Tropical Hardwood Hammocks of the Florida Keys: Why Sustainable Landscapes are Vital for the Region

The tropical hardwood hammocks in the Florida Keys are vital to the regional ecology of North and South America. Migrating birds from the Northeast travel through this corridor to South America for the winter. The Keys are the last “spring board” to prepare for the oceanic flight. If we lose this habitat, biologists suggest that it will be detrimental to habitats from North to South America. How can landscape architecture create spaces for people to enjoy the Florida Keys environment and preserve it at the same time?

Objectives:

  • Understand why the tropical hardwood hammocks are a key component for migrating birds.
  • Gain a greater understanding of the details of the tropical hardwood hammocks: their historical plant community, soils, topographical map, water, and plants.
  • See how can we design an ecologically sensitive habitat for people, plants, and wildlife.


Aloha Public Art: Exploring Honolulu's Art Scene

The recent conclusion of the inaugural 2017 Honolulu Biennial art exhibit, a network of art installations throughout Downtown Honolulu, marks a milestone achievement in the development of a local contemporary art program. Hawaii's geography, culture, history, and tourism contribute to the unique art scene of the islands. "Living Aloha" is a cultural statement meaning mindful living and connecting to the land. This mantra is reflected in Hawaii’s people, art, and culture. As the public art scene continues to develop and emerge in cities across the world, landscape architects have a responsibility and opportunity to design spaces for art and cultural exchange.

Objectives:

  • Gain insight about the contemporary public art scene in Honolulu as a model for cities worldwide.
  • Understand how local culture, history, geography, economy, and tourism influence local contemporary artists.
  • Discover how landscape architects can lead the conversation about public art by designing spaces for artistic expression.
Package Dates Price
SPOTLIGHT mini-series: Tropical TalkStory: Hardwood Hammocks and Aloha Art - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/NON-HSW) - Event Aug 24
$60.00
Member: $30.00
Member: $20.00
Member: FREE

The Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS): An Introduction to HALS and the Short Format Historical Report - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Aug 30

The Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) mission is to record historic landscapes in the United States and its territories through measured drawings, written histories, and large-format photography. The National Park Service oversees the daily operation of HALS. The American Society of Landscape Architects provides professional guidance and technical advice through their Historic Preservation Professional Practice Network. The Prints & Photographs Division of the Library of Congress preserves the documentation for posterity and makes it available to the general public.

Examples of HALS baseline and mitigation documentation prepared by professional landscape architectural practitioners will be shared along with examples of landscape architectural university programs using HALS to teach site documentation to students. Anyone may prepare HALS documentation for the open ended collection to promote preservation, and this presentation will explain how to prepare a HALS Short Format History for submission to the annual HALS Challenge competition.

Objectives:

  • Understand how to prepare HALS documentation for the open ended collection and promote preservation.
  • See examples of how to incorporate HALS into landscape architectural practice with baseline documentation and mitigation projects.
  • See examples of how to incorporate HALS into a landscape architectural university curriculum for teaching site assessment and documentation to students.
  • Learn how to prepare a HALS Short Format History for submission to the annual HALS Challenge.
Package Dates Price
The Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS): An Introduction to HALS and the Short Format Historical Report - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW) - Event Aug 30
$165.00
Member: $40.00
Member: $30.00
Member: $20.00