Recorded Presentations

Mar 4, 2013 ‐ Dec 18, 2017


Standard: $60.00
Members: $50.00
Associates: $40.00
Students: $0.00

Sessions

Conversations with Olmsted: His Visions for Reform - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

May 18, 2021 3:00pm ‐ May 18, 2021 4:00pm

Credits: None available.

Social justice, equity, and reform are not new topics for landscape architecture—rather, they are at its origin. Frederick Law Olmsted’s prominent role in shaping public opinion on social reform in the period leading up to and during the Civil War still impacts practice today. Join us for a conversation that recenters the way we tell the story of Olmsted’s work and origins of landscape architecture.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore conditions of 19th century cities including intense rural-to-urban migration, industrialization, and immigration, and how these conditions impacted the discipline of landscape architecture.
  2. Discover how, through his writing, Olmsted confronted the institution of slavery and the cotton economy.
  3. Explore how Olmsted’s values of and advocacy for social reform translate to today’s urban and cultural challenges.
  4. Identify how, from its inception, landscape architecture aimed to address societal and environmental conditions through design, and how racial equity and environmental justice issues continue to shape what we do as designers today.

This webinar is free for all members and non-members. Log in using your ASLA username and password for member discounts.

This event is co-hosted by the American Society of Landscape Architects and the National Recreation and Park Association.

Speaker(s):
  • Sara Zewde, Founding Principal, Studio Zewde
  • John Stauffer, Professor of English and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University
  • Charles Waldheim, Hon. ASLA, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Still Drawing – Design and Collaboration in a Virtual World - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Apr 27, 2021 1:00pm ‐ Apr 27, 2021 2:00pm

Credits: None available.

To create more equitable ideas, we need to create an inclusive design process with multiple and sometimes conflicting points of views. Our current WFH situation is a potential danger to forcing our design process and ideas to become more siloed. Equitable access to design technology coupled with the intentional incorporation of virtual tools will help us bridge the creativity and collaboration gap caused by the physical separation of our teams.

As our profession continues to develop a comfort level with remote-working situations, this course will help empower your site design process by evolving your design methods, technologies, and application. Through the knowledge received from this course, you will be able to further design with health, safety and welfare in mind, even when working in unconventional office environments.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how drawing still matters in virtual design and collaboration.
  2. Explore virtual tools and techniques for design and collaboration.
  3. Understand what we have learned through this year of drawing and collaboration.
  4. Consider how virtual collaboration translates into a hybrid office model.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00

Upstream-Downstream: Optimizing Bioretention Function Through Research, Engineering, Design, and Maintenance - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Apr 20, 2021 2:00pm ‐ Apr 20, 2021 3:00pm

Credits: None available.

A successful bioretention system requires research, engineering, design, post-construction observation, and a routine maintenance plan. Speakers will discuss how research underpins design decisions and highlight engineering and design features that enable bio-retention function and optimize maintenance.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how simple changes in underdrainage can dramatically improve bioretention performance.
  2. Explore best horticultural practices and plant design decisions for reducing maintenance costs and increasing public acceptance, comparing maintenance costs of different plant plan approaches.
  3. Review case studies on what plant material and maintenance practices provide the most long-term healthy plants and decrease maintenance.
  4. Explore a variety of bioretention systems and tools that fit within urban, transitional, and park settings through case studies from North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh Union Station and Fitts Woolard Hall, NC State University.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
  • Eric Davis, ASLA, LEED, AP, Vice President & Principal, Surface 678
  • William F. Hunt, PE, PhD, WNR Dist. Univ. Professor & Extension Specialist, NC State University
  • Donna Evans, LEED Green Associate, Program Manager II - BMP Inspection and Maintenance ESD Public, Montgomery County, MD-Department of Environmental Protection
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00

Changes to the Paycheck Protection Program: What You Need to Know Before the May 31 Deadline

Apr 12, 2021 2:30pm ‐ Apr 12, 2021 3:30pm

Credits: None available.

Join us for a webinar session on the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The PPP loan is a low-interest loan that can be turned into a grant and is accessible to all qualified small businesses. This session covers business qualifications and required documents when preparing to file the application. The current deadline for PPP loan applications is May 31, 2021, so be sure to participate in this timely webinar to expedite your application process!

On March 11, 2021, the American Rescue Plan Act was enacted, providing an additional $7.25 billion in funding for the PPP, expanding eligibility for first and second draw PPP loans, and revising the exclusions from payroll costs for purposes of loan forgiveness.

Join us to learn more about assessing your company’s eligibility and required documentation related to both eligibility and use of PPP loan funds.

This is a free, member-only, webinar!


Speaker(s): Moderator(s):
Members: Free
Associates: Free
Students: Free

Stretching Our Muscles: Expanding the Influence of the Profession in Non-Traditional Careers - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/non-HSW)

Mar 30, 2021 1:00pm ‐ Mar 30, 2021 2:00pm

Credits: None available.

Landscape architecture offers a wide range of potential career paths, thus the career path of a landscape architect is almost never linear. Many landscape architects pursue careers outside of the traditional path, seeking adjacent careers that help expand upon the profession. Meet three landscape architects who are using their design training and passion for landscape architecture in non-traditional ways. This session explores their paths, shedding light on the profession, its breadth of opportunities, its strengths and weaknesses, and the importance of collaboration with allied professionals.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain insight into non-traditional career paths in landscape architecture.
  2. Gain new perspectives on the breadth of the profession and the ways in which design training can prepare one to pursue many different career trajectories.
  3. Understand the reasons why the traditional career path may not be right for everyone.
  4. Understand the importance of allied/adjacent fields in the advancement of landscape architecture.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00

Smart Climate Solutions at Multiple Scales, Led by Landscape Architects - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Mar 23, 2021 2:00pm ‐ Mar 23, 2021 3:00pm

Credits: None available.

Rain Check 2.0 in Buffalo, New York is an innovative city-wide, government-led green infrastructure policy and regulatory initiative. The Thornton Creek Water Quality Channel in Seattle, Washington is a model urban redevelopment project made possible through public and private partnerships. This webinar will compare and contrast these two fascinating projects, which demonstrate how landscape architects are leading the planning and design of smart climate solutions at multiple scales.

These two projects are part of a set of 10 new case studies selected for ASLA’s Smart Policies for a Changing Climate online exhibition in partnership with the ASLA Climate Action Committee. In 2017 the ASLA convened a Blue Ribbon Panel on Climate Change and Resilience. Landscape architects and experts from affiliated professions outlined policies that help or hinder community resilience and adaptation to climate impacts. The result was a report Smart Policies for a Changing Climate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand climate change impacts in Buffalo, New York, and Seattle, Washington
  2. Learn about policy and regulatory approaches that successfully incentivize green infrastructure investment in public and private properties.
  3. Learn about how walkable, transit-oriented developments can be planned and designed to improve water quality and salmon habitat.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
  • Melanie Davies, ASLA, PLA, Senior Landscape Architect, MIG
  • Kevin Meindl, ASLA, Landscape Architect and Green Infrastructure Program Manager, Buffalo Sewer Authority
  • Vaughn B. Rinner, FASLA, SITES AP, Owner, Vaughn Rinner Landscape Architect
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00

Out There: New Practices of Community Engaged Design - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Mar 2, 2021 2:00pm ‐ Mar 2, 2021 3:00pm

Credits: None available.

Landscape architects are carefully and creatively designing engagement processes that are vital to successfully navigating increasingly complex issues. In this webinar, three designers working in different scales and cultures, will share tools on how to create community engagement that truly meets people where they are.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore the practice of immersive, community-engaged design from local and global perspectives, across a range of project sizes and types.
  2. Examine how existing methods for engagement have fallen short of inclusivity, and identify ways to create engagement processes that encourage more diverse audiences.
  3. Discuss lessons learned, best practices and emerging models for equitable engagement in vulnerable communities.
  4. Discuss how inclusive engagement processes are a means to invite productive dialogue around pressing issues that impact landscape architecture projects, such as climate change and environmental justice.
  5. Identify ways to measure impact of specific tools and techniques.
  6. Identify approaches for incorporating community input into physical design.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
  • Carolina Aragon, ASLA, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Nina Chase, ASLA, Principal and Co-Founder, Merritt Chase
  • Sierra Bainbridge, ASLA, Senior Principal and Managing Director, MASS Design Group
  • Gretchen Rabinkin, Affiliate ASLA, AIA, Executive Director, Boston Society of Landscape Architects/ASLA Boston
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00

January 29 Test Event with Zoom Link AH

Jan 29, 2021 11:00am ‐ Jan 29, 2021 12:00pm

Credits: None available.

Speaker(s):

Jenna TestJenna Test

Preview Available

Jenna Test

Jan 20, 2021 3:11pm ‐ Jan 20, 2021 4:11pm

Credits: None available.


Transformative Ecological Restoration: Farms to Wetlands - 1.0 PDH (LA CES/HSW)

Dec 8, 2020 2:00pm ‐ Dec 8, 2020 3:00pm

Credits: None available.

Throughout southeastern Massachusetts, working cranberry bogs are being abandoned or retired as cranberries are being grown more cost-effectively elsewhere in the U.S. and around the world. As cranberry farms were developed within former wetlands and along stream channels, they have been described as one of the leading factors in the loss of wetland function within the state. Retiring cranberry farms provides an opportunity to reclaim these wetlands and rescue these lands after hundreds of years of post-colonial impacts. These restored wetlands provide increased aquatic and terrestrial habitat, improved ecosystem functions, improved water quality, improved fish passage, and climate resiliency. This method of restoration also provides a model or restoration of other farmland in former inland or coastal wetlands. We will discuss the restoration opportunities and design elements, the linkages and working relationships with landscape architecture and site experience, and potentially view active construction activities on a former cranberry bog in southeastern Massachusetts.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe how the cranberry bogs developed into the form they are today when actively being farmed.
  2. Define the impacts and stressors that this agriculture has on the streams, wetlands, and ecosystems.
  3. Identify and describe multiple restoration techniques and the linkages between the restored ecology and the viewer experience.

Please complete a brief evaluation of this Online Learning presentation.

Speaker(s):
Tags: PPN-Hosted
Members: $40.00
Associates: $30.00
Students: $0.00
Standard: $50.00
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