Biodiversity & Climate Action 101 for Landscape Architects Webinar Series

Biodiversity & Climate Action 101 for Landscape Architects Webinar Series

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A free webinar series for ASLA Members hosted by the ASLA Biodiversity and Climate Action Committee. 

(Note: Dates and times for webinars beyond February are TBD and will be announced once confirmed.)

For more than a year, the ASLA Biodiversity and Climate Action Committee has been leading the implementation of the ASLA Climate Action Plan. Join climate action leaders for a 9-part webinar series to share collaborative research and knowledge to advance the goals of decarbonization and biodiversity protection.

This series is designed to expand knowledge within the profession to achieve the Climate Action Plan Vision for 2040 – All landscape architecture projects will simultaneously: 

  • Achieve zero embodied and operational emissions and increase carbon sequestration 
  • Provide significant economic benefits in the form of measurable ecosystem services, health co-benefits, sequestration, and green jobs 
  • Address climate injustices, empower communities, and increase equitable distribution of climate investments 
  • Restore ecosystems and protect, conserve, and enhance biodiversity. 

This webinar series is underwritten by
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  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/20/2024

    This session is a global introduction to carbon in the built environment tailored to landscape architects and landscape product vendors and contractors.

    This session is a global introduction to carbon in the built environment. It is tailored to landscape architects and landscape product vendors and contractors. Nearly 75% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions come from the urban built environment, and 35% are from outside the buildings. Understanding emissions from construction and operations is critical to reducing the climate impacts of landscape architecture projects.

    Landscape architects can use environmental product declarations (EPDs) and life-cycle analysis (LCA) to inform data-driven planning and design. These approaches can reduce climate impacts from built landscapes. Learn how to evaluate both EPDs and LCAs, which are integrated into green building standards, including SITES v2 certification.

    Speakers will review:

    • Key concepts of the natural carbon cycle
    • Common terms and concepts
    • Considerations for maximizing the carbon drawdown potential for the living landscape

    Underwritten by Landscape Forms

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of course participants will be able to:

    1. Understand the distinction between embodied carbon and operational carbon, as defined in SITES v2 Pilot Credit 3: Assess and Improve Carbon Performance.
    2. Discover essential practices and resources to reduce carbon-related climate impacts in the built landscape, which may be used to achieve SITES v2 Pilot Credit 3: Assess and Improve Carbon Performance.
    3. Articulate the differences between biogenic carbon stored in construction materials, dead biomass in nature, and carbon sequestration.
    4. Understand the life-cycle report stages and what information to look for in an EPD to understand the embodied carbon potential of a product and product class that may be used to achieve credits in SITES v2 Site Design - Materials Selection.

    The GBCI course ID for this course is 0920029478, providing SITES-specific CE hours required to maintain SITES AP credentials. Participants will need to pass the exam at the end of the presentation in order to receive a certificate of completion. Participants will need to self-report CE hours through their credentials account on https://sitesonline.usgbc.org.

    Christopher R. Hardy, ASLA, PLA, Certified Arborist

    Senior Associate

    Sasaki

    Chris Hardy is a Senior Associate Landscape Architect and Arborist at Sasaki, based in Boston Massachusetts.  Chris has been the principal investigator for Sasaki’s landscape Carbon Conscience research team from 2019 to the present. This project includes building both landscape and architectural datasets and translating them into a free and accessible design application, providing carbon metrics for planning and urban design analysis. Before Sasaki, Chris worked at SWA San Francisco and earlier at MNLA in New York City. Outside of practice, Chris participates in the design community through advocacy, teaching, service, and writing. 

    Pamela Conrad, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP

    Founder of Climate Positive Design, Lecturer at Harvard GSD

    Climate Positive Design / Harvard Graduate School of Design

    Pamela Conrad is an internationally recognized landscape architect and climate advocate. She is a senior fellow with Architecture 2030, and a 2023 Loeb Fellow and Faculty Lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. She founded Climate Positive Design to enable climate action by providing guidance and an app to support design teams in drawing down carbon while creating environmental, social, cultural, and economic co-benefits. She is a farm girl from Missouri, inspired by the richness and ingenuity of nature.

    Stephanie Carlisle

    Senior Researcher, Carbon Leadership Forum

    University of Pennsylvania - School of Design

    Stephanie Carlisle is an architect and ecologist whose work focuses on the interaction between the constructed and natural environment, including life cycle assessment (LCA), urban ecology, environmental justice, and climate policy. She is a research scientist at the Carbon Leadership Forum, where she works to develop open-access embodied carbon and LCA data, tools, and methods to support the building sector in radically decarbonizing construction.  Stephanie joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design in 2014. Previously, Stephanie worked for nine years as a Principal and Environmental Researcher at KieranTimberlake Architects in Philadelphia, where she helped lead the office’s research on embodied carbon, material health, landscape ecology, and environmental impacts. Since 2012, she worked on the development team for Tally, a software tool that enables architects and engineers to conduct full-building life cycle assessments during design. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/26/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    This session focuses on how to approach decarbonization as designers. Landscape architects are skilled at balancing a complex array of different considerations on every project, regardless of its type or scale. To achieve carbon reduction goals, our design approach must incorporate best practices and strategies seamlessly into our practice.

    This session focuses on how to approach decarbonization as designers. Landscape architects are skilled at balancing a complex array of different considerations on every project, regardless of its type or scale. To achieve carbon reduction goals, our design approach must incorporate best practices and strategies seamlessly into our practice. 

    The speakers will discuss how decarbonization strategies can be integrated with the existing project workflow, highlighting priorities and questions to ask at each design phase - from goal setting and team alignment to design decision-making, and technical oversight. A summary of the best practices to achieve reduction targets will be provided and the speakers will share more about the carbon accounting tools available to support designers. The session will conclude with a brief roundtable discussion of how to make the case for this approach with clients and project teams, then opening up to an audience Q + A. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of course participants will be able to:

    1. Understand when to effectively overlay decarbonization approaches onto existing project workflow, phase by phase.
    2. Learn more about the best practices to achieve carbon reduction through design decisions.
    3. Gain an overview of various carbon accounting tools, and when to leverage their strengths.
    4. Explore different approaches to making the case for decarbonizing design with clients and project teams.

    Marieke Lacasse, FASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C

    Principal

    GGLO

    Marieke’s leadership in multidisciplinary practice and landscape architecture has yielded significant, sustained impacts at local and national scales. Her commitment to promoting sustainability and ecological principles in dense environments has helped to create inherently social spaces that spark belonging and identity. She believes in the power of collaboration, emphasizing co-creation and design equity to ensure that built work reflects the unique character, values, and needs of a community. Marieke is an enthusiastic supporter of Climate Action and carbon drawdown in her work. She has served for three years on the ASLA Climate Action Committee, as well as for ten years at the chapter level. Additionally, she volunteers her time to support homeless and affordable housing, arts, and environmental non-profits.

    Mariana Ricker, ASLA, PLA

    Associate

    SWA Group

    Mariana Ricker is passionate about California landscapes and emphasizes the importance of site-specific, sustainable landscape design. She enjoys working in urban settings that engage diverse user groups and activate spaces essential to civic life.

    In her work as a landscape architect, Mariana seeks to create memorable experiences, connect people to the environment, and provide elegant solutions to accomplish the project vision. At SWA, she works on a wide range of projects, from community parks to large-scale urban development and planning around the Bay Area and beyond. Mariana is committed to climate action within her project work and professionally. She is a member of the national ULI Sustainable Development Product Council, and currently sits on both national and local ASLA Biodiversity & Climate Action Committees. 

    Andrew Wickham, ASLA, LEED AP, PLA

    Project Leader

    LPA Design Studios

    Andrew Wickham is a Project Leader at LPA, a national integrated design firm.  Andrew leads designs at the intersection of built, cultural, and natural systems and is a champion of metric-driven design.  His interest lies in how the blending of built and natural environments can enhance a user’s experience and reinforce values of equity, ecology, and curiosity.  Andrew is a proven thinker and strategist, speaking at numerous conferences about the value of performative landscapes and human experience. He is currently Trustee for California Sierra Chapter of ASLA and co-chair of the Leadership and Communication sub-committee of the national Biodiversity and Climate Action Committee.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 04/03/2024 at 4:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

    Coming soon... 

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 05/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 06/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 08/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

    Coming soon... 

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 09/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 10/01/2024 at 12:00 AM (EDT)

    Webinar date/time will be announced soon...

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