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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/31/2023

    The striking declines in insect populations, in addition to many other species, warrants an “all hands on deck” approach to conservation. Since 2015, the Rights-of-Way as Habitat Working Group has brought together organizations from across the U.S. and Canada to promote habitat on energy and transportation lands, such as rights-of-way (ROW). Beginning in 2018, a group of 40+ partners from across the energy and transportation sectors in the U.S., in collaboration with the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, developed the first nationwide Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances (CCAA) to promote voluntary conservation of monarch butterfly habitat on energy and transportation lands. This presentation will introduce the Monarch CCAA and what it means for conservation.

    The striking declines in insect populations, in addition to many other species, warrants an “all hands on deck” approach to conservation. Since 2015, the Rights-of-Way as Habitat Working Group has brought together organizations from across the U.S. and Canada to promote habitat on energy and transportation lands, such as rights-of-way (ROW). Beginning in 2018, a group of 40+ partners from across the energy and transportation sectors in the U.S., in collaboration with the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, developed the first nationwide Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances (CCAA) to promote voluntary conservation of monarch butterfly habitat on energy and transportation lands. This presentation will introduce the Monarch CCAA and what it means for conservation. 

    Learning objectives:

    • Explain why energy and transportation lands are crucial to habitat conservation.
    • Identify ways your local energy and transportation agencies can protect pollinators.
    • Learn how to communicate with your local energy and transportation agencies on what they can do to create and conserve habitat.

    Hosted by ASLA's Transportation Professional Practice Network (PPN)

    Photo credit: Illinois Tollway

    Caroline Hernandez

    Program Coordinator, Sustainable Landscapes program

    Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois Chicago

    Caroline Hernandez is the Program Coordinator for the Sustainable Landscapes program at the Energy Resources Center for the University of Illinois Chicago. Caroline supports the Rights-of-Way as Habitat Working Group and manages programs to engage energy and transportation leaders across the U.S. and Canada in pollinator habitat creation and conservation. Caroline is a LEED Green Associate, holds a dual master's degree in international relations and natural resources and sustainable development, and has a background in globalization, sustainable development, and climate change.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Phytotechnology utilizes plants to remediate groundwater and soils. Commonly the focus of obscure sites, recent phytotechnology projects have moved into cities increasing plant performance to sequester carbon and reduce the heat-island effect. This session explores the budding relationship between scientists and designers by looking at case studies that integrate phytotechnologies into public landscapes.

    Phytotechnology utilizes plants to remediate groundwater and soils. Commonly the focus of obscure sites, recent phytotechnology projects have moved into cities increasing plant performance to sequester carbon and reduce the heat-island effect. This session explores the budding relationship between scientists and designers by looking at case studies that integrate phytotechnologies into public landscapes.

    Learning objectives:

    • Discover the landscape architectural applications and metrics of phytoremediation and phytotechnology- how plants can be considered for the removal, or mitigation of contaminated soil and groundwater that frequently affect communities.
    • Explore recent case studies that illuminate the equitable, scientific, and public-health advantages that phytotechnologies can have on community and landscapes such as streetscapes, parking lots and brownfield developments.
    • Understand the science behind the multi-performance benefits of Hybrid Poplar trees that go beyond the perceptions of these maligned trees.
    • Learn the full-service methods to develop a robust phytotechnology planting application - from early planning strategies, client education, design and specification, propagation and sourcing, installation, and long-term maintenance and monitoring.

    Erik Prince, ASLA

    Principal

    Atlas Lab Inc.

    Erik Prince is a Principal at ATLAS Lab and a guiding force of the firm’s advocacy for culturally and ecologically responsive design. Erik translates strategic planning into experiential design, integrating natural systems and evoking local history. His leadership are distinguished in the profession with expertise in planning for resilience, building urban parks, and using innovative fabrication techniques in construction. Erik has been a Lecturer at UC Berkeley and Northeastern University. He holds a BS in Landscape Architecture from Colorado State University. He graduated with Distinction from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and was awarded the Jacob Weidenmann Prize.

    Kate Kennen, ASLA

    Owner & Associate Teaching Professor

    Offshoots, Inc. & Northeastern University

    Kate Kennen is founder of Offshoots, Inc., a Boston, MA landscape architecture and horticultural installation practice focused on productive planting techniques and phytotechnology consulting. She grew up on her family’s garden center Pleasant View Nursery, which she now helps operate, and has degrees from Cornell University and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design with distinction in Landscape Architecture. Kate’s book, co-authored with Niall Kirkwood, PHYTO: Principles and Resources for Site Remediation and Landscape Design, received national awards. Kate is also a fulltime faculty member at Northeastern University’s College of Arts, Media and Design teaching landscape technologies and planting design.

    John Freeman III

    Chief Science Officer

    Intrinsyx Environmental

    John L Freeman, Ph.D., is Chief Science Officer of Intrinsyx Environmental NASA-Ames Research Park and Researcher at NASA-Ames Earth Sciences Forestry Division in Biospheric Branch SGE. His research includes microbial endophyte phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated compounds, explosives, and tolerance mechanisms of Salt/B halophytic plants. He manages twenty phytoremediation projects in USA collaborating with large Environmental Engineering Firms, EPA, USGS and USDA-ARS and Supervises laboratory research projects at NASA-Ames. Dr. Freeman received a dual major B.S. in Environmental Sciences and Microbiology minored in Chemistry at Northern Arizona University and a Ph.D. in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Purdue University.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Traditional methods of practice have been called into question by social movements and health crises in recent years. Alternate business models that prioritize workers' rights and agency offer a clear path forward. Looking at several approaches via case studies, we'll explore the benefits to the firm, the industry, and the broader community.

    Traditional methods of practice have been called into question by social movements and health crises in recent years. Alternate business models that prioritize workers' rights and agency offer a clear path forward. Looking at several approaches via case studies, we'll explore the benefits to the firm, the industry, and the broader community.

    Learning objectives:

    • Discuss the societal demands being placed on traditional models of practice and identify what needs to change to remain sustainable.
    • Review 3 alternative business models available to design practices. 
    • Evaluate the pros and cons of each model through case studies and analysis.
    • Share benefits of worker-owned and stewarded practices: within the firm, the field, and the broader community.
    • Provide toolkits and resources for starting or transitioning a practice: online forums and articles, free seminars and courses, existing cooperatives open to sharing, and legal support.

    Ellen Garrett, ASLA

    Founding Member

    FWD Landscape

    Ellen Garrett is a registered landscape architect based in Brooklyn, New York. She recently launched The Flatbush Workshop for Design (FWD) to rethink the functionality and methodology of the design industry. In 2022, FWD will be establishing a worker-owned design cooperative, building solidarity through financial equity and creative agency. FWD investigates the current state of the design field and questions how it can better provide for workers, future designers, and the communities they serve. She aims to build trust, build wealth, and build visions for communities as equal design partners.

    Katie Lyon

    Head of Client Services

    Purpose

    Katie Lyon is the Head of Client Services for Purpose, an organization that helps make shared ownership structures more accessible and replicable in the U.S. economy. She has over 15 years of experience in economic and community development. Prior to joining Purpose, Katie worked to build career pathways for City University of New York students, provided economic development consulting with BJH Advisors, and managed a business improvement district. Katie earned a Master’s degree in Urban Planning from New York University. Katie is a member of the Associate Board of the Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services.

    Ashton Hamm

    worker-owner

    uxo architects

    Ashton Hamm, founder of UXO Architects is a licensed architect with experience in a range of project types - from private residential to large scale cultivation facilities to community design. Ashton is committed to expanding the role of cooperatives in the architecture profession, and is currently writing a book on the subject.

  • Contains 9 Product(s)

    Landscape architects are taking the world by storm by designing everything from school communities, to skateboard parks, healing gardens, zoos, resorts, museums, aquariums, and theme parks like Disney World and Legoland. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) wants to introduce students to the exciting world of landscape architecture with its first-ever PreK-12 Summit for students. The two-day virtual Summit, entitled DREAM BIG with Design, is the perfect kick-off event for the 2021-2022 school year. ASLA DREAM BIG with Design will showcase landscape architecture and hands-on PreK-12 learning sessions for students through a dynamic forum among PreK-12 educators and ASLA members from across the country.

    Landscape architects are taking the world by storm by designing everything from school communities, to skateboard parks, healing gardens, zoos, resorts, museums, aquariums, and theme parks like Disney World and Legoland.

    The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) wants to introduce students to the exciting world of landscape architecture with its first-ever PreK-12 Summit for students. The two-day virtual Summit, entitled DREAM BIG with Design, is the perfect kick-off event for the 2021-2022 school year.

    ASLA DREAM BIG with Design will showcase landscape architecture and hands-on PreK-12 learning sessions for students through a dynamic forum among PreK-12 educators and ASLA members from across the country.

  • Contains 9 Product(s)

    Landscape architects are taking the world by storm by designing everything from school communities, to skateboard parks, healing gardens, zoos, resorts, museums, aquariums, and theme parks like Disney World and Legoland. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) wants to introduce students to the exciting world of landscape architecture with its first-ever PreK-12 Summit for students. The two-day virtual Summit, entitled DREAM BIG with Design, is the perfect kick-off event for the 2021-2022 school year. ASLA DREAM BIG with Design will showcase landscape architecture and hands-on PreK-12 learning sessions for students through a dynamic forum among PreK-12 educators and ASLA members from across the country.

    Landscape architects are taking the world by storm by designing everything from school communities, to skateboard parks, healing gardens, zoos, resorts, museums, aquariums, and theme parks like Disney World and Legoland.

    The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) wants to introduce students to the exciting world of landscape architecture with its first-ever PreK-12 Summit for students. The two-day virtual Summit, entitled DREAM BIG with Design, is the perfect kick-off event for the 2021-2022 school year.

    ASLA DREAM BIG with Design will showcase landscape architecture and hands-on PreK-12 learning sessions for students through a dynamic forum among PreK-12 educators and ASLA members from across the country.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Texas weather has always been extreme, but with climate change, it is even more so. We expected increased heat/drought, but not 2021 Winter Storm Uri and the coldest temperatures on record. How did Central Texas plant communities respond? What can their response teach us about the complexities of designing/planning for climate change?

    Texas weather has always been extreme, but with climate change, it is even more so. We expected increased heat/drought, but not 2021 Winter Storm Uri and the coldest temperatures on record. How did Central Texas plant communities respond? What can their response teach us about the complexities of designing/planning for climate change?

    Learning objectives:

    • What designed landscapes survived various weather extremes, including the freeze, and why? How did Central Texas landscapes - including the Austin Urban Tree Canopy - weather the storm?
    • Discuss how focusing only on tree canopy can unintentionally lead us to neglect the herbaceous layer, which is very effective at capturing and storing carbon.
    • Discuss the silver lining of the winter storm/arctic wobbles that could act as a similar abiotic disruptor to woody encroachment of grasslands that fires and grazing provided historically.
    • Discuss best practices for designing/managing resilient and high functioning plant communities including the benefits of using only natives and the debates for more use of adapted species.

    Jennifer Orr, ASLA

    Principal, PLA

    Studio Balcones

    Jennifer is co-founder & principal of Studio Balcones, a landscape and urban design firm based in Austin, Texas. Her commitment to protecting and supporting healthy ecological systems sits at the center of her work. As a self-proclaimed “plant nerd,” Jennifer oversees all office planting design, and loves to insert whimsy and play into her projects. She has an MLA from The University of Pennsylvania and a BS from Georgia Tech. Jennifer is a 4th generation Texan with deep affection for Texas landscapes., is a mother of two, and enjoys exploring the natural world with her family.

    John Hart Asher, ASLA

    Senior Environmental Designer

    Blackland Collaborative

    John Hart Asher has over 13 years’ experience designing and building functional ecosystems within urban conditions. He has carried out research and development of native turf grass, green roof media technology, provided design consulting for urban prairies and riparian restoration, and has designed numerous native prairie green roofs all over the state of Texas. His projects have one awards from the American Institute of Architects, the International RiverFoundation, Architizer, the National Association of Flood and Stormwater Management Agencies, and Green Roofs for Healthy Cities. John Hart also serves as host for the award-winning PBS show, Central Texas Gardener.

    Emily King, ISA Certified Arborist

    Urban Forester

    City of Austin

    Emily King is the City of Austin's Urban Forester, an ISA Certified Arborist Municipal Specialist, and holds a degree in Forest Management from Texas A&M University. In her capacity as Austin's Urban Forester, Emily leads city-wide collaboration efforts to implement Austin’s Urban Forest Plan. She grounds her team's work with a focus on equitable access to the benefits that our community forest provides, and on climate adaptation to ensure the health of our future forest.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Since its Green Infrastructure Plan in 2010, New York City has built thousands of green infrastructure projects. The Gowanus watershed in Brooklyn was one of the city's first combined sewer watersheds to pilot many green infrastructure practices. Find out about lessons learned from plans, implemented projects, and maintenance and education programs.

    Since its Green Infrastructure Plan in 2010, New York City has built thousands of green infrastructure projects. The Gowanus watershed in Brooklyn was one of the city's first combined sewer watersheds to pilot many green infrastructure practices. Find out about lessons learned from plans, implemented projects, and maintenance and education programs.

    The GBCI course ID for this course is 920026649, providing SITES-specific CE hours required to maintain SITES AP credentials. Participants will need to pass the exam at the end of the presentation in order to receive a certificate of completion. Participants will need to self-report CE hours through their credentials account on https://sitesonline.usgbc.org.

    Learning objectives:

    • Understand the basic types of green infrastructure, how they work, and how they are being creatively adapted and applied in urban environments.
    • Understand and be able to clearly and concisely communicate the benefits, co-benefits, limitations and ongoing maintenance needs of Green Infrastructure to successfully incorporate green infrastructure in your design projects.
    • Understand key maintenance and operations challenges and considerations for green infrastructure and the role that Landscape Architects must play in designing and advocating for long term management.
    • Walk away with concrete examples of successes and failures in urban green infrastructure projects from an urban environment (New York City) over the last decade.

    Pippa Brashear, ASLA

    Principal

    SCAPE Landscape Architecture

    Resilience Principal at SCAPE, Pippa is a leading national expert on resilience planning and design. She works with multi-disciplinary teams to develop and implement landscape strategies and next-century infrastructure that integrate environmental, economic and social benefits. She leads both planning and built work teams within the firm, including SCAPE's Living Breakwaters project–approximately 2,400 linear feet of near-shore "breakwaters" designed to reduce risk and provide habitat for local marine life currently in construction off the shore of Staten Island. Her projects integrate systems thinking; natural and nature-based systems; engineering methods; and knowledge of implementation pathways to realize effective resilient design.

    Eric Rothstein

    Managing Partner

    eDesign Dynamics LLC

    Mr. Rothstein’s career has focused on ecosystem restoration and water resources planning within urban centers. He currently leads multiple teams investigating and designing sustainable water resource projects and habitat restorations across the United States and its territories include New York City, Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas, and throughout the Northeast. His international work includes water resource and ecosystem planning in Grenada, Nepal, Sao Paulo, Brazil, rural Rwanda, and the Aegean coast of Turkey.

    Andrea Parker, ASLA

    Executive Director

    Gowanus Canal Conservancy

    As the Executive Director of Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Andrea works to empower a community of environmental stewards and advocates in the rapidly changing Gowanus Watershed. As an instructor at City College of New York, she engages landscape architecture students with the complex ecological, economic and cultural forces at play in New York’s dynamic urban ecology. Her previous work as a landscape designer and gardener provides a pragmatic understanding of how landscapes are designed, built and maintained. She received a BA from the University of Chicago, studied Landscape Horticulture at Merritt College, and received a MLA from the University of Virginia.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed how we work, where we work, and how we communicate and collaborate. The very notion of the studio--the physical office--is in question. This panel will highlight methods and practices that we should and should not bring back to our physical workspaces.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed how we work, where we work, and how we communicate and collaborate. The very notion of the studio--the physical office--is in question. This panel will highlight methods and practices that we should and should not bring back to our physical workspaces.

    Learning objectives:

    • Understand how to foster re-imagined, collaborative workplaces that promote excellence in design quality.
    • How to create an equitable, positive, creative work environment.
    • Understanding of how to build meaningful synergy in the creative process, especially with other landscape architects, designers and communities
    • New ability to implement 'co-creation' techniques into external projects and community engagement tactics.

    David Fletcher, ASLA

    Principal

    Fletcher Studio, Inc.

    David Fletcher is the founding principal of Fletcher Studio. He has practiced in landscape architecture for 30 years, and has worked on the planning, design, and construction of projects ranging in scale from regional watersheds to furniture design. David’s formative education in field biology and fine art created an eclectic foundation where urban ecology, pop culture, and the California landscape intermingle with the everyday. David serves as Design Director for the office’s projects, collaborating with community organizations and designers to help bring planning, multifamily housing, and open space projects to fruition.

    Nathaniel Cormier, ASLA, LEED AP

    Managing Studio Director

    RIOS

    Nate’s interest in landscape design as a form of storytelling drew him to Los Angeles seven years ago after two decades of practice in Seattle and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from Harvard. Today, Nate helps lead a team of over 60 landscape architects working across diverse typologies and regions. He is passionate about civic and cultural spaces as well as restorative environments for health and hospitality. Current work includes major commissions in Tulsa, Denver, Phoenix, and Miami. Nate’s north star is an immersive beauty founded on formal curiosity, local materials, and co-creation.

    Gina Ford, FASLA

    Principal and Co-Founder

    Agency Landscape + Planning

    Gina Ford is a landscape architect, co-founder and principal of Agency Landscape + Planning. Underpinning her twenty-five of practice are a commitment to the design and planning of public places and the perpetuation of the value of landscape architecture via thought leadership, teaching, writing and lecturing. Her work has received awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects, the American Planning Association and the American Institute of Architects, among others. She is on the board of directors for the City Parks Alliance and the stewardship council of The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Our values influence our designs, and in turn, our designs give purpose to our practices. This session reflects on the hidden drivers behind our creative process and the values that reinforce design, leadership styles, and cross-generational mentorship. This is an open discussion among women at different stages of their careers.

    Our values influence our designs, and in turn, our designs give purpose to our practices. This session reflects on the hidden drivers behind our creative process and the values that reinforce design, leadership styles, and cross-generational mentorship. This is an open discussion among women at different stages of their careers.

    Learning objectives:

    • Critically reflect on the inevitable influence of personal values on design decisions and practice management, and how that can be used to foster cultural continuity within small design studios.
    • Assess the idea of 'relay' mentorship, and learn about how values can pass from one firm to new generations of firms though shared histories.
    • Learn how cultural shifts can create new opportunities within existing firms and founding of new practices, and potential pit falls to avoid during change management.
    • Explore how values and meaning influence community access to landscape work from a code perspective and more broadly through universal access, and equity and inclusion.

    Jennifer Ng, ASLA

    Senior Associate

    Klopfer Martin Design Group

    Jennifer is a landscape architect who defines successful and inspiring designs as those that speak equally to place-making and place-keeping. The consistent theme in her projects is to create a sense of home. Through her practice, stewardship of the environment and culture become an everyday, every project opportunity. Jennifer was raised equally in rural New York and Chinatown, Manhattan. As such, she has a deep appreciation for the lifestyles and landscapes that accompany rural and urban environments. Prior to joining KMDG, she worked with Sasaki, CMG Landscape Architecture, and Hargreaves Associates

    Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA

    President & CEO

    Hargreaves Jones

    Mary Margaret Jones is President of Hargreaves Jones, leading the firm’s offices in New York City, San Francisco, and Cambridge. Mary Margaret has over 30 years of experience, lecturing widely and holding board positions with the American Academy in Rome; The Architectural League NY; the Regional Plan Association; and ODC Dance in San Francisco. She is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome; the ASLA; the Urban Design Forum; and Senior Fellow of the Design Futures Council. Her work with Hargreaves Jones has been widely recognized, including the Cooper Hewitt National Design Award and Rosa Barba International Landscape Prize.

    Claire Agre, ASLA

    Principal and Co-Founder

    Unknown Studio

    Claire Agre is Cofounder of Unknown Studio Landscape Architecture & Urban Design. Bringing with her a background in oil painting and ecology, she has led design and implementation for a diverse portfolio of projects, including Governors Island Park, Miami Beach Soundscape, Longwood Gardens, Duke University Sculpture Park, The Mount Desert Land and Garden Preserve, and Houston Botanic Garden. Her design and intellectual interests range from the large-scale, long-duration works on coastal resilience, to the wondrous and immersive scale of the garden. Claire holds an MLA from the Harvard University and a degree in Environmental Science from Duke University.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Indigenous identity and history are often land-centered. This storytelling session will define essential connections between the land and subsistence lifeways. It will identify how we can restore, protect, reclaim, and revitalize Indigenous culture, language, knowledge, and ceremonies through critical partnerships and policies, while healing both the land and the people.

    Indigenous identity and history are often land-centered. This storytelling session will define essential connections between the land and subsistence lifeways. It will identify how we can restore, protect, reclaim, and revitalize Indigenous culture, language, knowledge, and ceremonies through critical partnerships and policies, while healing both the land and the people.

    Learning objectives:

    • Convey how past policies and present actions continue to limit Indigenous peoples access to traditional lands, and its negative impact on cultural heritage preservation.
    • Recognize Indigenous peoples' deeper perspectives and connections to land and nature and how these connections contribute to the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health of Indigenous People.
    • Recognize why Tribal Nations are natural partners for Indigenous-led conservation and understand the strategies, policies, and partnerships for the co-management of public lands.
    • Understand the value of Indigenous relationship to the land, how traditional lands are the origin of Native nations, and inseparable from the people, their culture, and their spiritual identity.

    ​José de Jesús Leal, ASLA

    Native Nation Building Studio Director

    MIG, Inc.

    José de Jesús Leal is a landscape architect with a passion for truth-telling. His professional journey is spiritual in nature - guided by the understanding that at times, he is the student. In landscape architecture, he has found a path to continuous self-discovery. As Director of the MIG’s Native Nation Building Studio, José's work focuses on the power of inclusive design and planning, and cultural relativism to connect people to the spirit of place. For José, community cohesiveness and self-determination are preventive medicines. He brings over 23 years of experience. He is an ASLA’s Diversity Summit Community Member.

    Elizabeth Elliott

    Executive Director

    Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority

    Elizabeth Elliott is a 36-year-old nonbinary person hailing from the village of Oleta in Northern California. They were raised in an activist family with the belief that every moment is an organizing opportunity, and every minute a chance to change the world. Their parents instilled in them the value to always fight for those whose voices are not being heard. Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree, works in Tribal Housing and Wellness, serving as the Executive Director at Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority in Northern California. Elizabeth dedicates their time outside of work teaching traditional skills to awaken resiliency.

    Nathaniel Willing, Associate ASLA

    Intern

    MIG INC

    Nathaniel Willing, descendant Sandy Bay First Nation, brings his passion for Native communities. He is committed to contributing to the improvement of Canadian First Nations and Tribal Nations in the U.S by working to imbue the community with Indigenous knowledge. He is sensitive to the needs of the community and has a powerful desire to make a positive impact on the lives of the people his projects touch. Nathaniel has collaborated with Native Leaders and Elders during his time at West Virginia University’s Native American Studies Program. They include Chief Oren Lyons, Dave Archambault II, Ada Deer, and Charlie Soap.